Events

April 25, 2014
SUICIDE AS EVENT? INTERVENING IN CHARLOTTE SALOMON’S INTERVENTIONS
Location: 
Fayerweather 411
Time: 5:30pm
Speakers: Darcy Buerkle (Smith College)

April 17, 2014
(DIS)PLACED?: IMMIGRANTS, HISTORIES, & THE SHAPING OF NYC
A Panel discussion with Gaiutra Bahadur (journalist & writer), Dai Sil Kim-Gibson (independent filmmaker), Samip Mallick (archivist), Mae Ngai (professor, Columbia University), and Beresford Simmons (activist, musician)
Abstract: What is the place of history in the shaping of narratives in and about immigrant communities in New York City? Immigration is often told as a story that begins with rupture and ends with assimilation – of severing roots, and building new ties. Yet, so often in New York with an immigrant population of 3 million, there are a richer, more complex stories to be found, archived, and told.  How do immigrant stories – told through art, film, and history – shape New York, the “majority-minority” city? Join the Center for International History for a panel discussion as we navigate the question of immigrant histories and the shaping of NYC — through film, through literature- academic, fictional and journalistic- through music, archiving, and activism.
Date: Thursday, April 17
Location: 406 International Affairs Building (420 West 118th St)
Time: 6-8pm, wine & cheese reception afterwards

April 15, 2014
A BOOK LAUNCH FOR THE CHILE READER: CULTURE, POLITICS, HISTORY
Location: Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd floor, Barnard Hall
Time: 4:00pm
Speakers: Panel discussion with Sol Serrano (Pontificia Universidad Católica, Chile) and Heidi Tinsman (UC Irvine)

April 11-12, 2014
QUESTIONING SPACES OF CITIZENSHIP IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE
Abstract: Fifty graduate students from across the world will join professors from New York area universities on sixteen panels exploring the spaces where individuals and groups come into contact with the state’s symbols and institutions.

April 8, 2014
REFRAMING ‘INDIA’ IN EXILE: THE EXCENTRICITIES OF PERIPHERAL VISION AND A VIEW FROM THE CENTRE
Location: Fayerweather 411
Time: 5:30-7:00pm
Speakers: Benjamin Zachariah (Karl Jaspers Centre for Advanced Transcultural Studies, Heidelberg University)

March 31, 2014
ON SECULARISM, IDENTITY AND ENCHANTMENT BY AKEEL BILGRAMI
Location: Schermerhorn 501
Time: 7:30pm
Speakers: Akeel Bilgrami (Columbia), T. J. Jackson Lears (Rutgers), Pankaj Mishra (Author), Manu Goswami (NYU)

March 31, 2014
REMOVER OF OBSTACLES: GANESH AND THE PERSISTENCE OF MYTHOLOGICAL GENRE IN HINDI CINEMA
Abstract: 
The mythological, the founding genre of Indian cinema, is one of its most innovative forms.  In the colonial period, it promoted nationalist ideals while avoiding censorship through its association with religion and tradition.  It is usually thought that the mythological genre declined in popularity in Hindi cinema in independent India, eclipsed by the social which foregrounded new ideas of Indianness, a concern which continued through the Bollywood films about the diaspora and the recent flourishing of the biopic.   Yet the mythological, ignored by many writers and critics, who saw the massive success of JSM in 1975 as a freak occurrence, has continued as a popular form in Hindi cinema, notably children’s animated films, up to the present, also flourishing in other media ranging from television, to popular English fiction. This paper looks at Hindi mythological films about Ganesh, the Remover of Obstacles, in the wider context of the evolving genre, discussing his changing image while also examining the nature of his gajatva or ‘elephantness’.
Location: 
Hamilton 303
Time: 10:30am
Speakers: Rachel Dwyer (SOAS)

March 12, 2014
SCREENING: Wounds of Waziristan with Amy Goodman
Abstract: The short documentary film, Wounds of Waziristan highlights the stories of those directly impacted by American drone attacks in Pakistan. Followed by a discussion with Madiha R. Tahir, Amy Goodman, and Manan Ahmed Asif.
Speakers: Madiha Tahir (Director of Wounds of Waziristan), Amy Goodman (Host and Executive Producer of Democracy Now!), Manan Ahmed Asif (Professor of History, Columbia University)
Location: Roone Arledge Cinema in Lerner Hall, 2920 Broadway, Columbia University

February 27, 2014
RE-PRESENTING PAKISTAN: Journalism, Justice and the ‘War on Terror’
Abstract: Pakistan has been called a failing state and the most dangerous country on earth. Western media has spotlighted the militancy and the duplicity of the Pakistani state towards its American partner. Yet, stories about the Pakistani victims of the “war on terror” remain scant even though thousands of Pakistanis have been bombed, disappeared, detained and displaced. This panel will examine the relationship between the representation of Pakistan in the media and the “war on terror.” It will discuss alternative models to pursue and publish ethical journalism.
Speakers: Asim Rafiqui (Photojournalist, Open Society Fellow), Sarah Belal (Human Rights Lawyer, Founder of Justice Project Pakistan), Madiha Tahir (Writer, filmmaker, Ph.D at Columbia Journalism School), Saadia Toor (CUNY Professor, Author of State of Islam: Culture and Cold War Politics in Pakistan)
Location:
 Columbia Journalism School, 3rd Floor Lecture Hall
Co-sponsored with The Sevellon Brown Fund, Columbia Journalism School Photojournalism Department, and the Center for International History

December 9, 2013
HUMAN RIGHTS ON THE WORLD STAGE
Speakers: Sharon Sliwinski (Associate Professor of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario) with commentary by Rosalyn Deutsche (Adjunct Professor of Art History, Barnard College)
Location: 602 Hamilton
Time: 6:15pm

December 5, 2013
EARLY MODERN CORRUPTION AND THE LUSOPHONE WORLD
Speakers: Nandini Chaturvedula (Centro de História de Alé-Mar, Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Location: 411 Fayerweather
Time: 2:30pm-4:30pm

December 2, 2013
COOLIE WOMAN WITH GAUITRA BAHADUR
Abstract: A conversation with author Gaiutra Bahadur and Bruce Shapiro.
Speakers: Gauitra Bahadur (Author), Moderator: Bruce Shapiro
Location: World Room, Journalism School 3rd Floor
Time: 6:00pm-7:30pm
Co-sponsored with the Dart Center.

November 13, 2013
BURSTING THE EXCEPTIONALIST BUBBLE
Abstract: Why North Americanists should read Brazilian History (and why most don’t)
Speakers: 
Rebecca Goetz (Professor, NYU)
Location:  411 Fayerweather
Time: 10:00am-12:00pm

November 7, 2013
VISUAL CULTURE OF HUMAN RIGHTS
A Conversation with Thomas Keenan, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Director, Human Rights Program, Bard College
Location: Second Floor Common Room, Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University
Time: 6:15pm

October 30, 2013
METATRANSPARENCY
Abstract: A discussion of the preparation and publication of the official documentary history of U.S. foreign policy in the Foreign Relations of the United States Series
Speakers: Joshua Botts and Lindsay Krasnoff
Location: 
 406 International Affairs Building
Time: 3:00-4:30pm
Co-sponsored with the MA/MSc Program in International and World History

October 30, 2013
ALTERNATIVE ACADEMIC CAREERS AND PUBLIC HISTORY
Abstract: A conversation between historians from the Office of the Historian, Department of State for a discussion on public history and alternative careers to academia
Location: 406 International Affairs Building
Time: 7:00-8:30pm

October 30, 2013
JUDITH BUTLER AND CORNEL WEST, IN CONVERSATION
PALESTINE AND THE PUBLIC INTELLECTUAL: HONORING EDWARD SAID

Abstract: On the Tenth Anniversary of Edward Said’s passing, renowned scholars Judith Butler and Cornell West will discuss what it means to be a public intellectual and Edward Said’s impact on the academic discourse of Palestine.
Location:
Speakers: 
Lila Abu-Lughod, James Schamus, Judith Butler, Cornel West
Time: 
7:00pm
Co-sponsored with the Center for Palestine Studies (CPS) with the generous support of the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) and the Anthropology Department, as well as the Middle East Institute (MEI), Heyman Center for the Humanities, Institute for Research on Women and Gender (IRWAG), Center for International History (CIH), Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (CSER) and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS).

October 2, 2013
THE HUMAN RIGHTS RESTORATION-REVOLUTION
Abstract: The opening lecture in a seminar series revolving around the largely unknown 1949 Unesco Human Rights Exhibition.
Speakers: Marco Duranti (Lecturer, University of Sydney), Discussant: Samuel Moyn (History Department)
Location: Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma.
Co-sponsored with the Institute for the Study of Human Rightsthe Institute for Comparative Literature and Society and the Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research.

August 29, 2013
DIGITAL HISTORY BOUQUET
Abstract: An introduction to the issues and resources concerning Digital History for the History Department community. Panels will focus on Theoretical Digital Humanities, Computational Methods and Scholarly Communication.
Speakers: Alex Gil (Digital Scholarship Coordinator, Columbia Libraries),  Manan Ahmed (History Department)